Content type: Industrial Design Project
Credits:
Conrado Bergemann (Alumnus of Post-Graduate Industrial Design KABK, 2019)
Year: 2016-2019

Introduction:
In the project Free to Alter - The Modular Motor Project, designer Conrado Bergemann explores modularity, waste, repairability, circular design and 3D printing. The concept revolves around a single motor to which multiple appliances can be attached, eliminating the need for the unnecessary and repeated manufacture of hardware that often sits idle. This also means that motor and the various appliances are much more repairable. When a component breaks, that section can be replaced rather than the entire object. Bergemann used open-source digital library parts so that people could print the parts they wanted for their motor and also invited three classmates to design modules for the prototype, demonstrating its adaptability to different uses for various people.

Free to Alter was submitted to the Circular Design Competition at Dutch Design Week in 2016 and Begemann was awarded both the Jury’s Choice Award and the Public Choice Award. From this proposal, he developed the concept into a product for his graduation project at KABK.

Free to Alter

Computer render of the motor with the milk whisk component.
Computer render of the motor with the milk whisk component. Image courtesy of the designer.
Exploded sketch of the Modular Motor.
Exploded sketch of the Modular Motor. Image courtesy of the designer.
Design components
This image shows designs for components submitted by classmates at KABK. The Hand Mixer by Jen Sengers, the Garden Drill and Electric Scrubber by Cecilia Polonara and the Milk Frother by Leon Wezenberg. Image courtesy of the designer.
Early prototype of the modular motor component.
Early prototype of the modular motor component. Image courtesy of the designer.
The final modular motor with the Garden Drill component attached.
The final modular motor with the Garden Drill component attached. Image courtesy of the designer.