KABK IST labs

The IST-plan is an excellent opportunity for you to customise your studies. KABK organises a wide range of projects that can be joined in the context of IST. We have divided our offer in two types of projects Research labs and Material labs.

Research labs

The research labs are experimental and research based interdisciplinary working groups, offered by one or more departments and/ or research domains. In the labs, the research orientation of the programs is further explored and deepened by encouraging students to work together on particular themes with students and teachers from other disciplines.

Research labs

Alice Twemlow

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday10:00 - 17:00There are no admission requirements for this course


For whom:

This lab is organised by the Design Lectorate and available for 2, 3, 4 year BA students and MA students from KABK and LU


About this lab:

In this course, a select group of students from KABK and Leiden University will collaborate on a curatorial project that explores the relationship between geological time and design. Using methods drawn from archaeology, material culture studies, and critical design, and informed by key texts and guest lectures, the working group will conduct research and speculate through design, writing and image-making on what are the designed entities of our age that will become signals in the earth’s geological strata — the fossils of the future. Outcomes of the course include written texts, images, designed objects and a collaboratively produced exhibition at KABK. The course will make use of some of the KABK workshops. In addition, the programme includes excursions to: Muzee Scheveningen; Den Haag beach for a plastics clean up with Suzette Bousema; Museon to see the largest example plastiglomerate; Stroom Den Haag; and the European Ceramic Workscentre (EKWC) in Oisterwijk. Guest tutors and lecturers include: Adam Nocek, Lua Vollard, Maura Biava, and Suzette Bousema.

Learning objectives:
The course is suited to anyone interested in the implications of design in relation to climate change, sustainability, deep time, hyperobjects, and the environment. Participating students can expect to:


• gain a fuller understanding of the issues surrounding design and the Anthropocene, through the close reading of key texts and engaging in lectures and discussion-based seminars;
• refine research and analytical skills and improve/learn new research methods distilled from the humanities, archaeology, future studies and speculative design;
• improve/learn writing and editing skills;
• improve/learn making skills through a variety of materials and techniques;
•improve/learn skills involved in curating and realising an exhibition.

Working methods:
The course will be taught via a combination of lectures, guided discussion of key texts, site visits, group workshopping of writing and design concepts, hands-on making workshops, and individual tutorials.

Assessment method:
Students will be assessed based on their understanding of, and contribution to discussion about, the key texts, their active engagement with the visiting lecturers, and their production of required outcomes, which include written texts, images, designed objects and an exhibition. They will be assessed on their individual work and their contributions to the collaborative project.



Required and recommended Sources:
The Responsible Object: A History of Design Ideology for the Future, ed. Marjanne van Helvert, Amsterdam: Valiz, 2016

Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene (Experimental Futures),Donna Harraway, Durham and London: Duke University Press Books, 2016

Dark Ecology: For a Logic of Future Coexistence, Timothy Morton, New York: Columbia University Press, 2016
Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet: Ghosts and Monsters of the Anthropocene, eds., Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, Nils Bubandt, Elaine Gan, Heather Anne Swanson, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017.

Are We Human? Notes on an Archaeology of Design, Beatriz Colomina and Mark Wigley, Lars Müller, 2017

Forensic Architecture: Violence at the Threshold of Detectability, Eyal Weizman (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press), 2017


For questions, please contact Lotte Betting, coordinator of the Design Lectorate, at l.betting@kabk.nl.


This course is run through the KABK Design Lectorate ''Design and the Deep Future''

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC7098


Apply for this course

Pawel Pokutycki (KABK), Ellen Dosse (Spaarnestad Photo) & guest lecturers

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday10:00 - 16:30No written motivated application required

THIS IS A 12 WEEK LAB (1 SEMESTER)

For whom:
All 2-3-4 year students from all departments.

Lab Discription:
This IST Lab aims for a collaboration between students of the KABK with Spaarnestad Photo. Foundation and Nationaal Archief. Students are challenged to give their views on the given collection of photographs found in the archive and produce new multimedia work referring to the specific visual material they choose to work on. The photo collection is the source of inspiration. Students are guest curators of the collection and use it for their personal projects. The goal is to "upgrade", interpret, transform the stories discovered in the archive of still images to new, contemporary forms of expression, with a strong emphasis on using different types of (digital) media and technology: interactive installations, VR, web-based projects etc.

Considered collections for academic year 2018-2019
• Upcoming mass tourism in the 60's (colour and b&w)
• Industry and inventions (mainly b&w)
• Panorama magazine with short journalistic stories
• Health care

Working method:
5 sessions exploring the archive
7 sessions & meetings focusing on concept development and production
2 sessions with guest lecturers
1 session to finalize the work for presentation.

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
67098


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Kees van Drongelen & Pascal de Man

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday10:00 - 16:30No written motivated application required


THIS IS A 12 WEEK LAB (1 SEMESTER)

For whom:
For students with an interest in connecting real life things with computers and vice versa. one can think of developments such as Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Robotics and the like. Tools that encourage tinkering; that encourage exploring physical and digital interaction.

HackLab will be a small group of around 10 students from different years and departments, who are highly motivated and talented. We offer these students the opportunity to obtain deep and specific knowledge of current developments in the field of hacking, DIY, computation and design.

About this lab:
Hacking is about using computers to change life for the better. Hacking is about crossing borders, transcending pre-defined fields and areas. Students are increasingly interested in creative and engaged hacking. Hacking revolves around mistrust of authority, promotion of decentralization and the idea that you can create art and beauty on a computer.

Students are given an initial assignment and are then encouraged to define their own assignment. In this way they learn to define learning goals specific to their craftsmanship and development as independent designers and artists.

Here are some examples of assignments:

Zombie machines
Mobile devices are designed to disconnect space and time. Thanks to them, we can easily be in one place and act differently in another. Disconnecting space and time offers enormous freedom. You are no longer stuck to the place where you are at the moment.

It has been said that the smartphone is a kind of ‘Lazarus Machine’ because it is reviving dead time. Mark Perry a computer scientist says ’Zombie Machine’ might be a better name because it is reviving dead time only partial.

The smartphone makes us less dependent on our physical environment, but it does not solve us from waiting. "People are using this technology just because they wait, not because the concept of waiting has been overcome.

Assignment
Design or make an object, service, device or thing that make people aware of the characteristics of the so-called Zombie Machines. This is meant in the most broadest sense. Please make use of web related technologies like node.js and/or embedded programming devices like Arduino or Raspberry Pi.

Sources
https://decorrespondent.nl

http://www.academia.edu

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC 7098


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Marjan Brandsma

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday10:00 - 12:30No written motivated application required


For whom:
2nd and 3rd year students of all departments that are advised to improve their reading & thinking skills. Is it meant for those students that want to expand their theory and frame of reference and want to learn to connect theory and visual work more in-depth.

About this lab:

  • Develop reading, writing, discussing and presentation skills
  • Deepen and structure your thinking and critical reflection
  • Formulate your arguments more accurate, be aware of your public
  • Develop a more profound understanding of relevant contemporary issues
  • Optional: prepare for the research and writing of the graduation Thesis, e.g formulate your Thesis research question(s)
  • Connecting theory and visual work more consciously and in-depth

We will make an inventory of the individual questions and needs of the students. You will make a plan for your individual project and formulate your steps and final end goal. This can be a combination of e.g reading books/articles that are relevant for you and your development; discussing chosen topics/questions/texts; doing and presenting specific research related to you and your work; visiting and reviewing exhibitions/lectures; writing and reflecting on your practical work; connecting theory and image, e.g translating or applying your theoretical research in a visual work, etc. The individual projects will be presented and discussed. This individual approach is combined with collective discussions and presentations, feedback and input. In this course you will strenghten and you develop your frame of reference, theoretical skills and theoretical reflection, and you will learn to connect theory and visual work more in-depth.

Literature:
To be specified depending on the needs and wishes of the students

Workshops:
KABK Library, Royal Library, Leiden University Library

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC 7098


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Rachel Bacon

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday14:00 - 17:00No written motivated application required


THIS IS A 12 WEEK LAB (1 SEMESTER)

For whom:
2nd, 3rd and 4th year students of all departments.

The drawing lab is for all students who are interested in exploring drawing as a method for developing ideas into images. Everyone who is drawn to exploring drawing as a part of artistic process is welcome. It ought to be especially useful for those who wish to incorporate issues of social engagement or other research into their work but are not sure how or where to begin

What do you learn:
Students will learn how to implement drawing as a tool that moves between different speeds of finished and unfinished, to generate ideas and images both rapidly and as final outcome. They will be encouraged to experiment and introduce new content and areas of exploration into their work. Each meeting aspects of drawing, along with relevant examples, will be introduced and explored. The lab will roughly be divided into three sections. Starting with the students' own personal likes and dislikes regarding their work, we will then move onto how their work is situated within the art world context. Finally, we will address how they present their drawing project to a wider audience. Within the larger process of developing their work, in the lab students will use drawing to move between collecting, filtering and refining initial ideas into distinct images.

Lab description:

Drawing is fundamental to many creative processes. It makes possible one of the most direct connections between thinking and making, mind and hand, idea and image. Democratic, fast, endlessly versatile, both low-fi and elaborate, it has a language of marks and materials all its own. In the lab we will focus on how specific aspects of drawing language may be used to fast track artistic ideas and processes. As each student will develop their own individual drawing project, reading, writing, site visits, archive visits, interviews, material experiments may also be part of the self study hours, as well as making drawings

Outcome and assessments:

The goal is for everyone to develop a process-based method of producing work facilitated by the elements of drawing. At the end, they should have a playbook or method they can use to explore and introduce new topics into their work, that they can develop through drawing. This method can eventually be applied to other disciplines. They will also have been able to enrich and deepen their knowledge and ability to make drawings, and place themselves within a broader artistic and societal context. At the end of the lab, finished drawings, sketchbooks and process pieces will be presented, if possible collectively with other labs.


Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC7098


Apply for this course

Maya Rasker

DayTimeMotivation
10 Wednesdays
15:00-18:30There are no admission requirements for this course

For whom:
This lab is organised by the Lectorate KTP and available for 2-3-4 year BA students from KABK and LU.

The course raises the question of how to recognize raw material for the expression of thought, of ideas and vision; how to use the potential of private (autobiographical) material for strong, eloquent storytelling. In the course, the act of writing – and more specifically of letter and fiction writing – and the analysis of the written will be presented as tools for artistic research, through the presentation of theories, writing exercises, and the study of texts by makers and thinkers. You will learn how to use these different forms of writing for the articulation of a research or project proposal. Above all, you will learn how to overcome the common ‘fear of beginning’, and to start writing.

The programme will guide you toward the production of a goal text – such as a poem or a selection of poems, a theatre piece, a short story, a graphic novel, a song text, a letter or a research proposal – as the outcome of the course, to be presented and discussed en groupe.

Please note: this is NOT a course in academic writing, and NOT a course in so-called creative writing. The main aim of this course is to learn to apply strategies in writing to support one’s artistic research and practice.


All further information can be found in the course description on the Lectorate website.

For questions, please contact Lotte Betting, coordinator of the lectorate, at lectoraatktp@kabk.nl.

This course is part of the Art Research Programme of the Lectorate Art Theory & Practice.

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
3 EC3549


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Gert Dumbar & Brecht Hoffmann

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday
10:00-17:00There are no admission requirements for this course


The Lab will start off with thoroughly researching and analyzing the fashion and cosmetics industry with a critical mindset. From there, you will narrate a caustic story and work on a multidisciplinary visualization with humor as a strategy for the design.

At the end of the semester we expect you to make a 4 minute film where you, in an absurd or humorous way, criticize the misdeeds and abuses in the cosmetic industry.


Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC7098


Apply for this course

Alessandra Covini & Francesco Apostoli

DayTimeMotivation
12 Wednesdays
10:00-16:30There are no admission requirements for this course

For whom:
This lab is available for all 2-3-4 year BA students from KABK

About this lab:

The work done during the Research Lab has the aim of freeing the concept of playground from fenced enclaves only reserved for children, and aims to bring back the idea of playfulness to the realm of the city.
We will get to know the forms and tradition of play equipment (amongst others by Aldo van Eyck, Isamu Noguchi, Pierre Szekely, Post-war British playgrounds, ...) whose materiality allows for a contextual overlap and integration with the city. We will build upon these examples by designing urban spaces and elements (sidewalks, squares, arcades, stairs, bridge, bus shelters, urban furniture) as potential playful structures, which stimulate imagination and creativity among citizens of all ages.

In the Research Lab, these festive elements will be conceived as structures able to establish new rules, rhythms and possibilities for action and interactions.
For this reason this course can generate a virtuous interaction between the Dutch context and other cross-cultural and cross-temporal references the students will bring in with their background. Therefore, the approach will benefit both students that already have experience with architectural / spatial-issues, and students that have different backgrounds (applied arts, graphic design, fashion,…). A crucial aspect of the Research Lab is to work with materials and develop 1:1 fragments or prototypes, both using the different labs of the Academy and through collaboration with professional manufactories. The result will be exhibited in the faculty and tested in public space in a pop up installation.

Learning objectives:

Each student will learn to:

  • engage deeply with materials and their qualities, in order to apply them to spatial, and performative/use-related solutions.
  • develop new skills / perfect known skills / challenge conventions and usual practices.
  • argumentation skills, coherence and work process
  • stand beside one’s work, defend it with a positive attitude and share it with generosity by engaging with invited guests and other students and teachers students
  • develop his own narrative and ideas about playgrounds and the public realm. This is also a way to be political, in that public space organises the way community is built and kept together.
  • build 1:1 material fragments/prototypes
  • explore the different labs of the Academy
  • collaborate, begin to define one’s role in the complex construction industry, via a discussion with manufacturers and craftsmen (inside-outside the school). work towards a final exhibition and realize an in-situ pop up installation

Working methods:

The Research Lab will be:
partly analitical: getting to know case studies
partly conceptual: forming
moslty applied: we want the students to engage practically with production, each according to his/her own skills and talents, or towards developing new ones.
Students will work on a series of performative, expressive, tactile, colorful play structures. To do so, the Research Lab will make the most of the potential of all the laboratories and workshops of the school.

Playground scale-models and 1:1 fragment samples.

We will visit and collaborate with professional manufactories, exploring new ways to work with industrial materials.
Since the Lab is not just a place of production but also a place of knowledge, several guests (from within and outside the school) will be invited to contribute to a critical reflection/ introducting deeper reflections to the applied attitude of the studio.
The final outcome of the students will be exhibited in the context of the faculty and into a pop-up installation in public space.



Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC7098


Apply for this course

Erik Blits and Jan van Grunsven

DayTimeMotivation
12 Wednesdays
10:00-16:30An additional motivated application is required.

For whom:
This lab is available for all 2-3-4 year BA and MA students from KABK

Best student works will be exhibited for three weeks at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam in fall 2019, during a Seminar on Rethinking Bauhaus

Application:
Participants will be selected on the basis of their motivated application. Apply before Monday 4 February 2019 23:59 h (CET) by registering for this course in Osiris. To complete your application, you will be required to upload a brief letter of motivation (max. 400 words, in PDF). The result of the selection will be announced on Thursday 7 February . Incomplete or late submissions, or applications sent by email, will not be accepted.

About this lab:
“There was no such thing as a consistent Bauhaus style – the Bauhaus was far too diverse and heterogenous for that. This is precisely what makes it still so interesting and contemporary today: the Bauhaus was an interdisciplinary, international workshop for ideas, in which diverse opinions, theories and styles coalesced in the search for the New Man, New Architecture and New Living; in which the primary focus was on an openminded approach to methods and ideas: namely on reinventing the world.” (from: Bauhaus at a glance. What exactly was the Bauhaus? https://www.bauhaus100.com/the-bauhaus/bauhaus-at-a-glance )

An exploration on reinventing the world by students KABK in collaboration with Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and Gerrit Rietveld Academy Amsterdam
In 2019 we celebrate the hundredth birthday of the Bauhaus (1919-2033). What could the Bauhaus mean today? To which social urgency could it contribute? How can we ‘reinvent the world’ today and which methods and ideas could be relevant? These questions are dealt with on three levels: rethinking material, rethinking product and rethinking environment.

Imagine your head is half a red ball, your arms end in a white chalice and yellow bar, your legs are like two cones, the right one white and the left one black. Finding yourself in a dark space without dimensions, you happen to be part of the Triadic Ballet (1924-1926) by Oskar Schlemmer, developed at the Bauhaus almost a century ago. You, the dancer, are the ‘figure’ and the symbol of ‘movement’, the dance a search for the relationship between man, space, form, movement, light and color.

As progressive and experimental as the Triadic Ballet, as radical and engaged was the idea of Walter Gropius for the Bauhaus (1919-1933). Fueled by the conviction that culture is the basis of our social functioning, the Bauhaus's main goal was to link art to the everyday. Committed with a better future as the Bauhaus was founded between two world wars, we happen to face several crises today of which climate change might be the most influential.

We challenge you to rethink Bauhaus.
We challenge you to come up with creative ideas for an era to come.


Working Method:
Based on the theme’s material, product and environment we would like creative designers from various disciplines to reconnect art to the everyday. The themes will be explored and elaborated on during the Research Lab.

The Research Lab covers three periods of 4 sessions each; every period has its particular goal:
- Period 1 _ researching the subject of your choice including a visit to the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam;

- Period 2 _ finding ways to express the subject of your choice by using specific methods or ideas;

- Period 3 _ translating the results in a proposal for the exhibition, i.e. making a public to engage with the subject of your choice.

For the Research Lab we will work in smaller groups.
We accept proposals of any kind and don’t expect you to stick to the disciplinary domain you represent.


Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC7098


Apply for this course

Marjan Brandsma

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday13.30-16.30 No written motivated application required


For whom:
2nd and 3rd year non-Dutch and exchange students of all departments


Extra study costs:
You need a Museum card and budget for train tickets to Utrecht and Woerden


About this lab:
In this IST course the non-Dutch/exchange student will dive into the avantgarde movement De Stijl, founded in the early 1920’s, and its historical and cultural context. We will study the work of Piet Mondrian, Theo van Doesburg, Gerrit Rietveld and other members of this influential group to find out what De Stijl actually was: A magazine? An art movement? An idea, a world-view and an approach to life? We will do so by doing research and presentations, having lectures and excursions to relevant museums and archives e.g. Gemeentemuseum, Mauritshuis and RKD (Dutch Institute for Art History) in The Hague, Centraal Museum and Rietveld-Schroderhuis in Utrecht. We will do a Dutch polder landscape walk near Woerden (7,5 km) to experience the connection of history, design mentality and landscape. The end result is a research publication that presents the content of the course, your research and reflection on the relevance of De Stijl in the contemporary visual world.

Learning goals:
- learn more about the Dutch avantgarde movement De Stijl and its influences on (contemporary) Art and Design
- position De Stijl in the background of Dutch Art History and Culture
- create a better understanding of the Dutch context of your study at the KABK
- develop and deepen your critical reflection
- expand your investigative and open attitude


Literature:
Hans Janssen, Michael White (2011), The Story of De Stijl
Aaron Betsky (2004), False Flat, Why Dutch Design Is So Good


Workshops:
KABK Library, Royal Library, Leiden University Library

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC 7098


Apply for this course

Ewoud van Rijn


8 Tuesdays16:30 -19:00.Motivated application needed


For whom:
2nd and 3rd year students of all departments that are interested in classic printmaking techniques such as etching, relief printing, lithography, monoprint, monotype, mezzotint. To these ‘dirty, inky’ and intensively hands-on media we take a intuitive approach. The downstairs printmaking workshop offers room to explore the wide range of each of these printing methods and the possibilities to mix them up.



About this lab:
As William Stanley Hayther, founder of the legendary print workshop ‘Studio 17’ in Paris used to put it: ‘My notion of a workshop is like a far-out research department; we are not there to produce editions. The fundamental thing that is useful in a workshop is that the thinking is done in the medium itself. You find what you want in the medium itself. You find what you want during the operation, by means of the operation. If you don’t finish with more than you had at the beginning, I consider it a waste of time.’

In this Lab we explore printmaking on the basis of a indicative proposal of the student: a short statement in which the student describes what development in their work the student would like to elaborate on in print. The project proposal is handed in before the start of the lab. The Lab treats the whole spectrum of printmaking: from acquiring basic skills to using printmaking methods for activating ‘visual thinking’. Through a critical process of trial and error, opening horizons and creating focal points we aim to arrive at the best approach for your initial proposal, learning more than a few tricks of various printmaking operations along the way, and making printmaking an integrated part of your artistic toolbox, that will hopefully have a positive influence on your other artistic practices.

Dates: feb 12-march 5,12,26-april 9,23-may 7-june 8



Workshops:
printmaking

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
3 EC 2454


Apply for this course


DayTimeMotivation
12 Wednesdays
10:00-16:30An additional motivated application is required.

For whom:

Open to all 2-3-4 year students. Maximum group size 25 students.

Application:
Apply before Monday 4 February 2019 23:59 h (CET) by registering for this course in Osiris. To complete your application, you will be required to upload a brief letter of motivation (max. 400 words, in PDF). The result of the selection will be announced on Thursday 7 February . Incomplete or late submissions, or applications sent by email, will not be accepted.

About this lab:
A unique opportunity to join Turner prize winning British design collective Assemble (assemblestudio.co.uk) in developing a live project that will take place in the Hague’s former American Embassy. Space Agency is an invitation for students to work alongside Assemble to reimagine the Embassy as a physical manifesto for free space - to help transform it from fenced off and menacing fortress into a public resource that welcomes and serves those populations who have been at the sharp end of the systems which the Embassy symbolises.
Based in the iconic Marcel Breuer building, students will work to alter its languages while considering and experimenting with its relation to the city. Involvement will centre around a number of briefs connected to ideologies and spaces within the Embassy: these will range from built interventions to research assignments and self-directed projects.
We will eat lunch together, taking it in turns to cook for everybody in the group.

Learning outcomes:
• a fuller understanding of the issues surrounding the ‘right to the city’ & the architectures of migration;

• an engagement with the contradictory politics of collective and participatory practice in a capitalist context;

• close and supported reading of key texts and discussion-based seminars;

• examine lazy assumptions and false dichotomies, e.g. that socially oriented work cannot have aesthetic quality, that culture should be produced by the ‘gifted few’;

• refine your critical, research, writing and editing skills;

• expand your experience with materials through a variety of experimental techniques;

• improve your critical understanding of spaces and buildings;

• direct involvement in producing events and collective organisation.

Key texts:

Claire Bishop, Artificial Hells
Colin Ward, Anarchy in Action
David Harvey, The Right to the City



Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC7098


Apply for this course

Material labs

When it comes to thinking with your hands, the workshops are the place to be. Experimentation and coincidence start with execution; with doing. Your intuition and the intuition of your hands, can be key ingredients in a creative process. In the material labs teachers and workshop instructors share their expertise with you.

Material labs

Koen Hauser & Krista van der Niet

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday10:00 - 16:30No written motivated application required


THIS IS A TWELVE WEEK LAB. First six weeks by Krista, next six weeks by Koen. Maximum 15 students can participate.
In the 6-weeks block with Krista there will be a lot of focus on still-life & studio, and in the second block of 6 weeks with Koen you will focus more on people & studio.


For whom:
2-3-4 year students from all departments:
Everybody with an interest in staged and conceptual studio-photography, who wants to learn more about directing and getting control over the staged image.

So, all you D.I.Y. enthusiasts, tech-freaks, perfectionists, meticulous and patient makers, team players, critics and illusionists, do apply for this course!

As you will be working with very expensive equipment, proof of your liability insurance is necessary.

What do you learn:
During this IST Lab we will develop your photographic studio & technical skills, to make sure that you too can make sharp, beautifully light and sexy staged photos of your work, an idea, or an object!
We will discuss, sketch and plan images in order to gain total control over your vision.
You will control each detail of an image, from composition to lighting. But at the same time, we will leave space for improvisation and trigger micro-accidents in order to give soul to an image. Playing and experiment is essential!

The main focus of the Lab will be to search the limits of documentation and broaden your horizon and discover your particularity.
Could photography become a new tool of creation in your practice? Will you manage to create images that transcend mere documentation and become new autonomous work? Working in the studio implies much more than only making still lives though! And we will also work on how to stage the body and create a persona.

You’ll learn many different possibilities for working on staged photography but also in the field of directing, styling and concept-development, so you get more in control over your photography, and experience the endless possibilities a studio offers you.

Lab description:
The studio is fun, consider it a playground!
This lab is about actively working and experimenting, you’ll be working in the big studio of the photography-department. Your focus is on your own project, but together we’ll also have group-discussions and plenary feedback-sessions.

There will be weekly assignments, to get you started and inspired, yet they leave space and freedom for personal interpretation.

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC3549


Apply for this course

Marc Barreda

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday15:00 - 21:00No written motivated application required

THIS IS A SIX WEEK LAB AND WILL ONLY RUN THE FIRST SIX WEEKS OF THE SEMESTER.

For whom:
All departments- introductory and advanced levels of workshop experience. This course will ask a high level of productivity in order to achieve its goals and support remarkable development.

What do you learn:
To develop an in depth familiarity with the workshop facilities of the Academy and to establish a strong rapport with the extensively skilled staff.

  • To develop the skills of thinking with your hands and thinking through making.
  • To explore the history, functionality, manufacturing and design scope of the tools that are most important to your own practice.
  • To challenge yourselves to explore materials and objects in much greater depth.
  • To conceptualise your practice and explore the meaning and importance of the articles with which you make.

Start length and study load: Six weeks, one day per week. Start at 15:00 and work until 21:00 with a break for a collective meal in order to discuss and share techniques. From 19:00 to 21:00 will be offered feedback and brainstorming if desired. Students must come to class ready to work with clear plans or approaches in mind, complete drawings and materials in hand.

Lab description:
Between idea and manifestation lies the process of creation. Whatever one’s field of expression, there is a series of physical tools he or she uses to realise an idea. As an artist’s practice develops she might find that she returns to a fundamental set of tools and while the contents of the toolbox continues to grow, this set gets used and reused and perhaps used up. Why do you rely upon these tools? What makes them work so well? What makes them different from others? How would you design these tools? Could they serve your purpose better, or are they perfect in their being? How do these tools identify you and your practice?

Photographer, sculptor, painter, any kind of maker; how simple would it be to produce a pencil, a paintbrush, a hammer? You can make a tripod for your camera. You can make a reflecting screen, a hot wire foam cutter, a chisel, a perspective machine, a sketchbook. The class will be designed around your practice and your skill level with the main goal being development.

During this class you will identify your main set of tools and through readings, discussions and independent research as well as intensive days of making you will make these tools that are so essential to your practice. This will demand focused and productive workshop days as well as independent preparation. Each student will be expected to research and understand how each tool is made and develop drawings, models, plans and processes by which to realise each tool. He will be required to familiarise himself with the facilities and materials necessary for production and make good use of the workshop technicians as resources.

You will make a minimum of five tools during this Lab after an in depth introduction and preceding an extensive evaluation day where all tools will be presented, discussed and demonstrated. In the end you will have made your tool box and your experience in making will set you on the road to a new way of thinking, that which comes from the hands.

Workshops: The main workshops will be metal and wood. However, all other workshops that will aid in the production of your tools can be accessed if it is clear that they can be used efficiently (i.e. the use of the digital workshop will be available for those competent in the foundations of that workshop).

Credits/ EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
3 EC7098


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Ferenc Molnar

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday10:00 - 16:30No written motivated application required


THIS IS A 12 WEEK LAB (1 SEMESTER)

For whom:
For students who are interested in either experimenting with advanced visualization technics ( AR, VR, Holographic projections) or working on working on interdisciplinary platforms (such as; creating stand alone installations, combining analog and digital assets and techniques, web based projects, creating interactive installations (interaction between installation and viewer)), or developing projects for live digital performances (interaction between artist and installation such as live audio responsive graphics, live video mixing, non linear story telling, vj performance with working in collaboration with music composers/producers (live motion graphics, video mapping on objects).

Being able to switch between or choosing the right medium is very relevant in the contemporary art world, but also for designers and for architects to visualize their ideas, projects. New tools (like; 360 video, AR,VR, drones,) emerging and finding their way into our visual culture rapidly. A basic understanding and know how is essential to anyone who wish present him/herself professionally (as designers, photographers) or in the contemporary art scene.

Lab description:
This workshop gives students a flexible platform to experiment and to practice with the available, newly developed digital tools.
It gives a better understanding of the complexity of multidisciplinary workflow to aid them in communicating their ideas.
The workshop is project based (choice of the students, but it is advised to choose projects that support/aid them developing assignments for their main study program).
Prior knowledge or experience with software such as After Effects, MadMapper is not necessary for signing up for the course.

Workshops:
This course runs in close co-operation with the Multimedia workshop. Chris gives practical support during the production phase, but also provides students with pre-production tips about equipment, about editing footage efficiently and about post-production techniques like color grading.

Credits/ EC'sSelf- study hours
6EC70


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Vibeke Gieskes

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday09:00 - 15:00No written motivated application required


THIS IS A 12 WEEK LAB (1 SEMESTER)

For whom:
2nd, 3rd and 4th year students of all departments.

What do you learn:
The Lab 'Crafting your thinking, reflecting your craft' focuses on the simultaneous engagement with theoretical and material research in the workshops. The students are encouraged to explore and formulate own ideas and fascinations about their profession. During the course the students are developing their own research methods both in theory and in practice. Finding connections between and simultaneous development of the actual technical making, doing theoretical and material research and reflecting on this will be stressed during the process.

Lab description:
During the first meetings of the lab each student will sharply formulate an own fascination that will be the leading topic of the student's material research. The student will follow a path in which of theorising, technical apprentice, analysing, writing, making drawings, prints, visuals and reflection all takes place simultaneously (guided by the workshop instructors and the theory tutor at the same time). This way of working generates new insights, depth and new impulses for the way of approaching a project.

The workshop instructors will emphasise the importance of communicating through images by using and practicing specific techniques. The instructors will assist in doing physical experiments, helping the students to choose and explain the techniques that fit the ideas of the students and the instructors will assist in the actual material research. The theory teacher will encourage doing research, analyses and reflection by the slow but precise process of writing as tools to raise the awareness and create sharp ideas about the material research that is being done.

Keeping a notebook for documenting this process is required. Examples of practical experiments in relation to end results and work of others will be offered, but looking for these references is also an important part of the student's own research.

In the end the students present their theoretical and material research as a process, using drawings, sketches, writings, works, etc. The end result is in fact a written and visual path that shows the intuitive process of making in the workshops, the process of thinking with the hands and the student's awareness about this process by reflecting on it, writing about it. For the student the course leads to an understanding of the artistic process when making and theorising are to be seen as an undivided whole.
The way the student presents the process is also part of the project: how have you organised your process and how did you manage to do combine theoretical and practical research. The end result should give clear insight in this process and this particular working method. Each of the students should be able to give words to the uniqueness they discovered in their own method and process.

Workshops:
Textile and Fashion: Gino Anthonisse, Tardia Page & Beleke den Hartog.
Wood and Metal: Masha van de Kuiner, Ronald Scholtens & Eduard Sjoukes.

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
6 EC7098


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Raymond Chabot Toudin

DayTimeMotivation
Wednesday10:00 - 16:30No written motivated application required


THIS LAB IS SET UP IN TWO BLOCKS. YOU CAN REGISTER FOR 1 BLOCK/6 WEEKS (3 EC) OR FOR 2 BLOCKS/12 WEEKS (6 EC)

For whom:
This IST is for anyone who wants to learn more about film making or needs help with developing
her or his current film project. Suitable for students with knowledge on all levels of film & video making. From novice to advanced.


What do you learn:
Practical & theoretical knowledge helping you to convert your idea into a film with ease and
raise the general production value of your films. This course seeks to help you understand the
logic and grammar of film language and the related logistics. Regardless if you are aiming to
shoot a documentary, fiction or a artist film. Classes introduce theory of lighting, camera, sound recording as well as more hands on practical sessions where you get to try out your knowledge in small groups. Several lessons will be given in conjunction with media and photography workshops. Afternoons are spent developing individual projects of the student.



Working method:
Morning: general introduction devoted to one of the typical facets of filmmaking: script, storyboarding, production, sound, camera, light etc


Cinema Expanded Website

Credits / EC'sContact hoursSelf- study hours
3/ 6 EC35/7049/98


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